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are in a complex economy that really relies on organizations to provide us with necessities. so we have to everything you and the longer-term, focus on stories that represent trends do not exaggerate noise and we have to get away from here. so fear play the role in the development of human societies in the earliest stages is encoded in our dna. but to evolve to this complex modern environment we live in, we have to update. so that's a sure question speaks to you. >> host: are you fearful venture capitalists? >> guest: you know, the opposite of that is maybe you say well, venture capitalists has to be inherently optimistic, you know, because why would you invest in some thing that the returns and so forth. telling about and prosperity, that is history easily care to race. this is not to miss the. from my stand point i think about optimism about the definition of an optimist if somebody was systematically latepromoter desiccate the true distribution of outcomes is. and the pessimist if someone has systematically really. they are there an hour in advance. anything could've happened. had to
" and paul krugman, author wrote train to talk about problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour 45 next on booktv. [applause] >> well, thank thank you very m. thanks to the passionate attitude and technology in shakespeare books for hosting the event this evening. i also am very excited. i think we are all very excited to see probably two people who i would say are unquestionably the most cited economists in the world today. [applause] in addition to being most cited, and as you all know, those are noble laureates, i would have to say from the vantage point of the institute of economic thinking that if i were to nominate two people as being the most courageous economists in the world and the most impactful, the subpoena to find a list. so we're very excited to be part of this conversation. [applause] as you know, each of them has written a book that pertains to our current challenges and circumstance. joe stiglitz spoke, "the price of inequality" and paul krugman's book, "end this depression now!" are part of your goodie bag tonight. therefore on behalf of them i will thank you for
, it is not a recession, it has been building for decade-sapping the ability of the american economy to grow, and the average american to rise. to make the u.s. less competitive, less attractive for business, we go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again because unless we get the economy really moving and growing in a long run, these budget problems will occur over and over again. we have identified eight areas where we find, these things would move the needle in a reasonable time frame, two or three or four years we start to see impact and there's quite bipartisan support. and the sustainable budget compromise. number 2, easing immigration now. we need a broader immigration reform, but it is one of the abilities to move rapidly to inject skill to the economy to fill jobs we badly need to fill to sustain our growth. it is not long term solution to the skill problem in america but a critical step we need to take to move the needle. we have got to simplify and realize the corporate tax code. everybody agrees. we just did a survey that included a loss of members of the general p
is to talk about the economy. but i would say something is. romney only emphasized -- very quickly. we cannot run only on an economic message. we have the full conservatives on social issues, on the national security, and on the economy. spent and aspirational. aspirational a mechanism where you are free to go as far as you want to go and to do what you want to do. and you are right about the hispanic community, especially they are very and trunk -- entrepreneurial. guess what. they start liking free government less. >> unfortunately, we're out of time to want to thank you all for coming today. please join me in thanking our panelists for this terrific presentation. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> tonight in primetime we get a closer look at the presidential election. we have from president obama's former campaign manager and republican strategist steve smith. that's and university of delaware and starts at 8 p.m. eastern. here on c-span2, author mark friedman talks about how more baby boomers are entering into a second careers. he's the author of the big shi shift. that's also at 8 p
by 20% stuff like that. the old problem was not enough spending in the economy. one player that should have been spending more was the government thinks to adolf felt hitler they did but they should have been doing to increase spending. there is overwhelming confirmation and this is a time to have the government spend more would pit -- but people to work and put capital to work it is hard politically because it is hard to persuade people which is why some of us write books. [laughter] >> host: someone argue with you to say you do the spending big issue of boost then you fall back. but we did not to. what happened? >> that is interesting story. a lot of people just like montgomery ward was a major store chain. but the major -- but he believed they would come back so he hoarded cash waiting for the depression to come back by the time it was clear they lost their position in the marketplace. is not steadied as much as it should have been but that story of what is going on is about excessive practice with the debt bubble and it burst leaving people stranded with too much debt. what happene
and argues that it hurts the economy. this is about 40 minutes. >> and howard hughes for research at the manhattan institute. thank you for joining us. the question of whether and how governments, particularly the federal government direct tax dollars to industries was a discussion last night presidential debate and is becoming an ongoing theme in the campaign. the term on which the finance and industries have also been the focus of intense debate, but probably the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth of the manhattan to senior fellow and speaker this afternoon focuses and are tightly regulating to disaster, have green jobs policies are damaging america's economy. in fact, she subjects the assumptions and policies which led to such elevated as of now bankrupt seller paid no manufacture as well as the electric car battery manufacturer to a withering analysis, which we at the institute have come to expect from this oxford trained economist who served as chief of staff of the council of economic advisers -- sorry. during the administration of pres
a share so many in common -- an economy and larger value system. we share security needs and we share security threats. when you have a relationship that close, it cannot help but be good. it has been good. i look for to four more years of working with president obama. >> you just returned from asia. you seem dead like them in a little jet lag. >> president obama is in asia. his first trip when he was elected was here in ottawa. his first trip for his reelection was asia. you both you asia as important both of you are committed to enhancing free trade. you are looking at 50 trade deals. i wanted to ask you -- when our organization was founded 25 years ago, we were founded to be a proponent of free trade. there are not enough voices on either side of the border that point out the benefits. that is why we started it. my observation is that canadians are more open to free trade than americans. their message is of protectionism. what are your observations? what do you attribute the difference to? >> in negotiations on trade agreement -- we are and 50 to go she asians. one is with the euro
that in itself says that when the economy is contracting, there is a competitive advantage to having an education. >> has always struck me with my students. apple would much rather have students with a liberal arts background than a background in computer science or engineering. they are much more adaptable and capable of change. i am not aware of this study, but during the late 1990s, the business higher education forum conducted a study of ceos and see what they sought from college graduates. while they expected some skills, what they were really after was individuals that were committed to continuing having had capacity to continue to learn. not only that they are adapted to change that they can drive change and adapt to an increasingly diverse world. in that sense, it really kind of defines the important part of a liberal education is a background the background for this. the other thing i would mention we really need a liberal arts training before they enter these programs. so i think it really reinforces that. >> i think you are very bright about the data. particularly over the long-term. a
about how enacting comprehensive immigration reform can help on the jobs and economy issue. simply put, immigration reform would create a fair, humane and effective system that levels the playing field for all workers. right now our immigration system doesn't work for anyone but unscrupulous employers. we need to take the power out of the hands of those who are exploiting our current immigration situation and put it back in the hands of workers and fair and honest employers. if all workers have a legal status, employers can't skirt labor laws said they have to pay fair wages and abide the rules. immigration reform is the right thing to do as well as the economically smart thing to do. children should not have to live in fear of their parents deportation every day of their lives and some of the hardest working and most honorable people in our society should not have to be subject to exploitation and harassment. finally, i would just like to say that i'm truly appreciative of the support we have received from the urban league and other african-american leaders on this issue. i know that
the government, we will close down the american economy and, in turn, the global economy. if they do not solve the issue of this runaway spending, get some way to stop borrowing in excess, he tells the president of the united states if we default on this, on our obligations and our ious, we will trigger a depression worse than the 1930s. anybody here remember the 19 1930s depression? you probably don't. i don't. i was not born, but i've read about it. it was a calamity for the world. tim geithner said to the president what, if we default on this, if we do not solve this problem, we will have an economic catastrophe that will make the 2008 financial crisis a footnote in the history books. anyone remember the 2008 financial crisis? that's coming not from some columnist or journalist, that is coming from well-informed secretary of the treasury. you think about this, there is a value in running scared. if you think about after 9/11, the terrorist attacks, one thing the country did collectively is they set up tsa, the screening at airports. there are all kinds of work, very significant work done to
. this is someone else on the investment committee said. is point was the transformation of the world economy lift poor people in china and india into the middle class and one american drops out of the middle class, that is not such a bad trade, 4-1. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company and this is a person with a charming and lovely life story, his parents were immigrants and he told me his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily for. imagine that, temporarily poor and sure enough complete rock stars, both of them went to new york. and the mass club, one brother in silicon valley and another is derivative on wall street. the technology cfo, his parents were really angry at him because he dropped out of a ph.d. program in applied math at stanford having gone to harvard to start becoming plutocrats. very hard-working guy, did smart, did great, this is what he said about the american middle-class. we are demand higher paycheck than the rest of the world. if you are going to demand ten times the paycheck you need to deliver ten times the value. it sou
opportunities of a state. so did the prime minister to drive these over the economy. >> made the offer to the hon. gentleman on would happily share a platform to defend the united kingdom. the invitation got lost in the post and i make the offer again. and we have seen the report a preliminary report before the full report. that is why the office of fair trading has a new power to suspend the consumer credit license. the report shows many companies are not sticking to the guidelines and that is not acceptable. >> my right hon. friend with the study to make sure milton king is the area for economic growth. >> my hon. friend is a spokesman and welcome to me many crimes and has a successful economy. one of the things we need to change is to get the housing market moving again and i am convinced that as part of the recovery. >> many apprenticeds, the youngest only two pounds 60 an hour so the prime minister could take away benefits from young people who simply cannot live -- >> this government supports the growth of the princessships, under this government on the issue of housing. where th
a lot of -- >> he's got a cleaner slate than four years ago with an economy. >> start building the sub structure to show actual progress. a debate in the white house is, like, it's a long term thing, health care, for instance, but showing results any time soon to people in need. well, that was the long term game. of course, the stimulus was the short term game, but, still, americans don't feel the effects. some of it is marketing, some of it is real, of a lot of what obama's done. i think the key now is, because of the re-election, he'll actually have time for americans just to go, well, i feel a little better, and it's substantive, it's real. my health insurance -- >> that was true of clinton, and david said in the conversation that clinton adopt seize the reigns of a -- didn't seize the reigns of a second term. >> seized something else instead. [laughter] [applause] >> that was good. >> the whole year before wasting 1997 before the scandal broke will. >> welfare reform -- >> asking dave because we're in biography here. i'm fascinated by them figuring out who they were in childhood. y
, that the labor supply remains small. and the guest worker program is key because, again, to grow our economy we need to grow many industries that need that foreign work force. the last immigration reform that we had on the reagan years lacked a workable guest worker program. that was amnesty. we gave amnesty to three million individuals. but at that time the market had already absorbed those three million individuals, so what happened? immigrants kept coming in to do jobs that americans didn't want or where there were simply no americans working age to do them. so another community for undocumented immigrants was created. we need a mechanism to facilitate the legal flow of the foreign workers that america needs. and it can't be a mechanism with quotas arbitrarily set by government. because at the end, the issue of illegal immigration is an issue of big government. it is big government saying we're going to have tease guest worker programs that are going to be highly regulated and in some areas or for some type of jobs, we're going to cap. we're going to have ridiculous quotas that don't represe
we talk about moving the needle as a whole so the industrial economy is larger. if we could take the innovation model the cultural revolution and then the internet could be the beginning. then we could see whether revolution could do. with a new industrial revolution i will look at it as the third. how this works. rear it is the quick wind. how many people think that it came in the 1700s? 1806? half of the room. 1900? of smaller group. the answer is nobody has a precise definition of the most think 1776 with the american revolution with the distinction but to have such power so we had amplified human potential and that potential meant they could be more productive and be of low entrepreneur or a cottage industry than the firepower turns into water power but that basically replaced muscle power with machine power to amplify human capacity it doubled like that in the united kingdom between 30-year 58 million and huge improved the quality of life it you may think the factories were dark satanic mills but you have access to clean water and sanitation. will also heard try. people did
.s. economy. a television series based on the united states is currently in development as well. we're pleased to welcome to hear about his newest book, a pitcher's history of the modern world, which in this case is going to be from 1898, two just after the second world war. please join me in welcoming larry schweikart. [applause] >> well, thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it's really an honor and one that i wish my father was alive to see. heritage is one of those great bastian said liberty in a swelling sea of collect this and. you probably didn't know that you are getting somebody here who was the previous rock drummer. this later became significant learning -- as a learning experience when i began working on this film. but all along, my experience and about and were pretty informative. sma students i know about communism because i was in a rock band. we shared everything, had nothing to start. when mike allen and i would've "a patriot's history of the modern world," we identified three major elements that made up americanism. nevertheless, we never really provided
cartwright. much larger housing it. one-way ticket about this is that the great growing economy in china per capita carbon emissions levels go up about 100% if they stop at the level of wealthy but hybrid -- out by less than 30%. that's a huge difference. whether or not you live in global warming are worried about the price of gas at the pump, we have a lot to gain by china in the building of rather than a. i think the most important thing for america to do in order to encourage a to have it is to get it some urban policies interpret that means stopping our cities as if they are the ugly stepchildren of america and recognize them for the economic heart line, apart a chance -- the heartland for this country. the american dream can only mean a homeowner in the suburb every means rethinking policies that pay for highways with general tax revenues, driving people to drive longer distances, above all honor city schools which are such critical ingredient for urban success in such a critical problem which despite enormous hard work by people language, mayor menino, like the city council, are so far
convention and james carville reminded me with all the talk about the economy that we don't live in an economy, we live in a society. i care deeply about the society we are creating and i use the word creating on purpose. today community does not happen organically. you have to be very intentional and deliberate about that, and city council is in the midst of a school reassignment process, i have learned quality is subjective, the definition of that. city council is redistricting. i have learned community is subjective. how neighborhoods are defined. i do believe in investing in infrastructure and all those things that would eradicate or mitigate a brain drain, but ultimately, i believe it doesn't matter if we have more affordable housing or better jobs or better schools. if people don't want to live here. that has everything to do with community and the soul of the city. people want to be a part of a city that is diverse and inclusive and welcoming. neighborhood is about social interaction and that is how we build community. in a city like boston that has 22 distinct neighborhoo
and the economy. the industrial revolution -- let me stop and turn to the competition. thank you. [applause] >> i appreciate you doing this and i think it is very interesting that you have drawn these parallels between what is happening in the physical industrial revolution and the previous antecedence, semiconductor revolution, digital revolution as you talk about, one thing i remember from watching the growth of the web, reflected already in the questions coming right up, people are a little bit skeptical that what is happening in hobbyists's garages is relevant to the mass manufacturing and move the needle. i will share one question from the audience. i completely understand the applicability of 3d printing a think you have way overstated what is or will ever be possible with 3d printing. i understand your logic but those who have not read the printed will be disappointed. please comment. >> 3d printers are just one of a whole generation of tools, there are laser cutters and emt machines and embroidery, you buy sewing machine, basically the digital application tool as well. three printers that
about that from? >> yes, the economy has been growing nonstop since 1961 and it was absolutely powerful, moving ahead that a steam engine in 64 and 65 and begins to have trouble in 65 and another minor breaking point here. in the early 60s i went through a book called print executions which covers in part this. this was a time of the grandiose expectations and johnson was nothing if not grandiose. he's larger than the state of texas. he's this great big guy. not much of a speaker, but really on top of everything. people are contrasted into obama and usually obama doesn't come out in these and the way johnson managed congress. he's constantly on the phone, counseling at the white house, really on top of things. clearly he wanted to get these things done. people used to think johnson was this characteristically boisterous texan image conservative in civil rights. but i will pour into his background. by 1965, clearly with a strong liberal and believed that government could do good things and he would get them done. >> so much of what has happened in american society during the late 20th ce
cut down the economy. our friend, not warren buffett but the other guy. a great conversation, ralph nader has been by. years ago -- >> what did he learn from his -- >> did me a favor of not bothering me with his problems which was great that spin too much time trying to make money. >> a useful friends with him? >> i never said anything about him. >> as we go, you have an unusual hobby. you, something unusual. >> i have a collection of backers. also have a collection of airsickness bags. one thing i do ask people who come to the meeting, very helpful if you are traveling, you have an airsickness bag which the free present government afghanistan air sickness bag, so it is a great collection and somebody mentioned years ago in a profile starting in an e-mail, this is -- and odd quirky thing i did. >> what is the mood at the meeting going to be? >> people are very optimistic. people were disappointed because we didn't have the house senate president and then people thought we were going to get the president in the senate and stock didn't go up. we elected a house stronger than the last
think there's a very serious damage done to the economy and to the world economy and the approaches bush took running up to this and that obama is put on steroids. this is in the middle of many problems to continue to not be ended. and the was a very big problem. to be much more serious about spending and it was in that way before. >> how do you fix? >> the house republicans already passed the budget that would work and pass the extension of the tax cuts they would work and you go in and have these conversations in front of the american people without about how romney is mean to dogs and causes cancer and actually talking about issues. and i think that is a debate that we need to have. we haven't had it, certainly didn't have it in this last election and we can have it now. it's very helpful. i think at the end of the day we will make the right decision partially because the democrats are terrified of the damage that obama has to drive them over and they wouldn't actually do that as obama threatened to throw us off a cliff year ago in august and didn't. >> we weren't going to get the neg
. but the transformation of the economy and meanwhile what america and drops out that is not a bad trade. i spoke to the cfo of but technology company as a person that was tied with these born and told me his parents told him that they were temporarily pour. imagine that. sure enough him and his brothers are both rock stars and avid members of the club now they find it. one does silicon valley the other does derivatives on wall street. his parents were angry because he dropped out of the ph.d. program of applied map after going to harvard. very smart and it did great and this is what he said. we demand a higher paycheck and the rest of the world. said you need to deliver 10 times the value. it sounds harsh but people in the middle class need to decide to take a pay cut. similarly was when i heard about the financial crisis. i expected wall street to feel guilty and realize you don't tell the truth to the reporter but they are off the record. almost invariably they did not blame themselves. this ceo told me sincerely he did not feel guilty for the crisis the culprit was his cousin who owns three c
as well as our economy. my message was pretty simple. a solution is possible. republicans have been reasonable and president needs to lead. he is the only one who can get us to a solution. if that's what he wants, we'll succeed. so it was with some concern that i read this morning that the president plans to hit the road next week to drum up support for his own personal approach to the short- and long-term fiscal challenges we face. in other words, rather than sitting down with lawmakers of both parties and working out an agreement, he's back on the campaign trail, presumably with the same old talking points that we're all quite familiar with, but we already know the president is a very good campaigner. we congratulate him on his reelection. what we don't know is whether i has the leadership qualities necessary to lead his party to a bipartisan agreement on big issues like we currently face. so let me suggest that if the president wants a solution to the challenges of the moment, the people needs to be talking to are members of his own party so he can convince them of the need to ac
in the economy. republicans couldn't agree more about that, which is why the proposal the president spoke forward to solve the cliff raises taxes on how must a million small businesses who employ 25% of the workforce. ernst & young has been a study that if the president's proposal went into effect to raise taxes on small businesses that they are, they will cost us us over 700,000 jobs, reduced take-home pay by 2% and reduce economic growth by 1.3%. so you've got a lot of analysis out there, lots of economy seem that the president is reposting to do would hurt jobs and the economy, which is again ironic in that the presidentonly solution right now to solve our fiscal cliff issue is to raise taxes. in 2010 we had the same debate. the president said he shouldn't raise taxes in the middle of a weak economy. at that time, economic growth was 2.4%. this year, 2012, the same number is 1.8%. the economy is slower and weaker than it was in 2010 when the president says you shouldn't raise taxes in the middle of a weak economy. we believe the president has got me. it can't be on the people who create jobs i
for the workplace. we are not going to be the world's most innovative economy. second, in some ways, more surprising for me, it was brought to us by the former chief of secretary of the army, who talked about the problems in our education system and the relationship to the armed forces. the inability of some 70% of americans actually qualified for service in the armed forces ought to be a red flag for anyone. now, yes, there are other reasons for that. incarceration, obesity, but a fair amount of it is that the people can't pass the basic skills test to get into the military. so just imagine a country -- a developed country, a powerful country in the world. and we can't get the basic tasks. analyzing data secretary of state is realizing how few people how -- how they learn foreign languages, the fact that we don't have people who are prepared to go into the intelligence agency and we are lobbying ourselves appellate in literally the national security infrastructure of the country. so most importantly, it is a tragedy that people will not be prepared for a good job and will therefore have nowhere els
president obama's deep cuts will have a deep effect to our economy. he used the word dwast stating. snowing this how could anyone support depleting another $1.8 billion from an already stretched budget? president obama's climate chief defended the green fleet by arguing even a dollar rise in gasoline prices would cost d.o.d. $30 billion. believe my good friend, the senator from colorado said essentially the same thing. i agree with that. if every $1 rise in gas prices cost $30 million, a $27 increase would add up to about $660 million so that argument falls completely flat in realizing the economic angle is a political hoozer the obama administration has tried to say it's about national security in getting off of foreign oil. that's where i want to get. i spent several years as chairman of the environment and public works committee and several years as the ranking member. all during that time people keep saying the one thing we all agree on is we need to be off of foreign oil. we need not to be dependent upon the middle east. and yet right now we know and no one is going to refute this fact
coverage on c-span2. >> thank you the government has taken action to protect the economy to achieve strong sustainable and balanced growth. because of this action in over 1 million private sector jobs created across the uk since we came to power. >> in the interests of the honorable gentleman let's have a bit of order. mr. andrew sullivan. >> in two years this government has greater 1.2 million net new private sector jobs, nearly double the amount the last government created the last 10 years. how have we done this in wales? >> i'm very pleased to inform the house we are seeing similar good progress in wales. an estimated 60,000 additional private sector jobs have been created in wales since may 2010. >> order. questions to the prime minister. henry smith. >> number one, serve. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'm sure before answering the whole house will wish to join me in expressing our sympathies to the terms of the appalling flooding we've seen across our country in recent days. and also in getting support and praise to our emergency services, the police, fire, and the service and invited a
and how well we have done educating the people to take their place in the economy and i would hope whatever agenda comes forward we have an agenda that is deeply focused on adult learning, adult education, community college and finding more ways for people to constructively entered the economy. >> i would concur with many of those points. i am grateful i live in a state that has the governor in deval patrick, living in a country with president barack obama. i am vigorously supporting him. creating a better access to educational opportunities and health care which is eliminating other disparities. the thing that is important we not obsess about, 99% or 47% and remember there are people behind those percentages. people who have been struggling and living in poverty. talking about the shrinking middle class, who are they joining? i want a president and a governor and a mayor that believes in making critical investments in physical infrastructure and in people's that supports the role that everyone has to play in the economy including kid putting people on a path to self sufficient lea
to our gross domestic product. money we would have had added to the economy of this country but for our failure to educate these kids. so now where we are is we're in a place where we're playing catch-up with countries that used to crave to be like us. it's so bad now that while our university systems are still where they should be in terms of reputation and attainment, no one really from other countries wants to send their kids over here to go to our k-12 schools. they do that there, and then they say, okay, we'll try to send them to some ivy league school or some good college in the states. and we're at the point now where we need to seriously look at what is it going to take to change that dynamic. well, you know, in recent days we've heard about the teachers' strike, and i think that the big challenge we have is we put ourselves in these partisan boxes, and we force people when we talk about education to take sides. and you know the side that's never adequately represented in these discussions? these kids. so i just posted on my blog, i said, okay, how will a teacher strike in chica
in the too big to fail scenario of 08 is when hank paulson said if this doesn't pass there will be no economy on monday. to you think with the romney or obama as president of another such moment occurred that the tea party types would listen to people like that and still send the economy down the drain? >> well, there is a moment that i memorialize in my book during the debt ceiling standoff that i think is real, you know, illustrative. the thinking of the more conservative flank. and it was the house leaders, you know, i'm answering your question in a general way because i can speak specifically in the future. but there were concerned. they believe that ceiling needed to be raised. they did believe that risking the full faith and credit of the netting states was a very dangerous proposition. they believe that a default would be a terrible thing for this country, and so because they could see that a lot of there fellow members did not believe that to be the case they brought in this treasury, this former treasury undersecretary named j. paul who served in the george herbert walker bush of min
because it's good for the economy. without thinking about what it does for those of us who are looking to find homes in america . [applause] >> please. >> these guys did such a great job of playing up the issues. again this going to tell a story. before i do that, because i am from washington and because it's halloween and because i have three children, all of some of the church retreat to my will report year that the most popular cost and that is completely is binder full of women. >> what did the selling custom look like? you put your arms in the binder. it's like not at jack in the box . pops out of a little fuller think. said we were bell in washington. very creative. i'm just going to tell the story that inspired me to read my book. this began in 2009. the book is based on an atlanta store which cannot in 2010. basically i have been vacationing for a long time which is a pretty prosperous working class town. when you went there. it seemed like it or not that many men around. it seemed like a was not seen them in church, at the fairgrounds, driving down the street, trucks, during c
the economy. >> the diversity of fuel sources as well as efficiency travel parallel to the interest of the environmental policy in my judgment. >> we did, the congress did agree on the standards and the administration has continued to work in the industry to move those numbers up even more so there is a classic example of how we did something. >> i wondered if the recommendations you are making i understand that you are trying to bring together all these agencies across the executive branch whether they are of the legislative branch is a very much partner in this. how do your recommendations bring the congressional leaders and to coordinate with them as well as the executive branch leadership? >> we will recommend that this would be institutionalized or created also legislatively. but i think the congress will benefit from what our council would come up with. congress would benefit from. i guarantee you with the members of the congress particularly the senate we looked at the quadrennial report and we know what the result was of that in that study analysis of what we need going forw
to make homes more and more and more expensive. because it's good for the economy. without thinking about what it does for those of us who are looking to find a home in america. [applause] >> since these guys did such a great shuffling of issues i think i'm going to tell a story. but before did i just want to say that because i'm from washington and because it's halloween and because i have three children, all from love to trick or treat, i will report here that the most popular cautioned that has come up lately is binders full of women. [laughter] spent what does this hollow and caution look like? you put your arms in the binder, and it's like sort of nodded jack-in-the-box. it's like a jack lalanne in the box. who said we're dolan washington? i'm going to tell a story that inspired me to write my book. this began in 2000. the book is based on a story came out in 2010, and basically i had been vacationing and have a longtime which is a pretty process working class down come and one year i went there and it seemed like they were not that many minaret piercing like i was in a church, the f
education, community colleges and finding more ways for people to constructively enter the economy. >> and, counselor. >> yes, i would concur with many of those points. i am grateful that i live in a state that has a governor in deval patrick and living in a country with president barack obama. i'm vigorously supporting him for all the reasons you just stated, in creating better access to both educational opportunities and health care which is eliminating all those other disparities. i just think it's really important that we not obsess about the 99% or the 47% and just remember that there are people behind all those percentages. and people who have been struggling and people living in poverty. we keep talking about the shrinking middle class, who are they joining? and so i want a president and a governor and a mayor that believes in making those critical investments in physical infrastructure and in people that supports the role that everyone has to play in the economy including getting people in poverty on a pathway to self-sufficiency. that is just as important. >> round of appl
. >> that is what is interesting. you have two of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmarish situation that raises the fundamental question. that draws people closer together. part of the title today is mischief and miscalculation. what was really interesting if you could have 17 different spheres of contact with the soviet end of two of them well, you could still have 15 others. there is a lot of heavy investment and how to talk about things like that and in this era, when i look at the amount of time, particularly in the obama administration, if you look at senior officials go to asia throughout the region and they have meetings or others and also the discussion that tends to coordinate with china, there seems to be a lot of efforts try to coordinate. looking out the value of the in the dispute and said that they were shocked and surprised by the level of miscommunication and assessment and the dangers of that between china and japan. so raises the question of whether or not -- i agree with you. i know china wants respect. but whether or not what you are seeing is a strategic or taxa
of systemic risk to the economy, then that is a proper, you know, the fundamental proper role of regulation to make sure that is in some way firewall. .. marc friedman author of the new book, "the big shift" navigating the new stage beyond midlife talks about the need for better social programs and savings plans for people in their 50's, 60's and 70's who want meaningful and sustaining work later in life. from the commonwealth club of california in san francisco, this is 45 minutes. >> good evening and welcome to the meeting of the common wealth club of california. i am chair the clubs grown ups for amend your host for today. we also welcome our listening audience and we invite everyone to listen to us on line at commonwealth club.org. now it's my pleasure to introduce our distinguished speaker. marc freedman is ceo and founder of encore.org, a nonprofit organization working to promote encore careers. second acts for the greater good. he spearheaded the creation of the experience core, now one of america's largest nonprofit national service programs engaging people over 55. and the purpose
economies in the world. the u.s. and china share a lot of interests and most importantly people in both countries share an interest in for example dealing with climate change. something that neither government is not the chinese are u.s. government are prepared to move strongly enough to change. when we talk about pivoting in the context of sending the troops, that doesn't help when we are trying to do with what should we be doing about climate change. i think what we really need is a pivot away from the military being the centerpiece of our diplomatic shift and a shift towards engagement with people at an entirely different level. >> host: a recent study by the brand company in the project for the air force talked about u.s. overseas military presence and the strategic choices that the government has to make. one of the comments in that report says, the u.s. has to decide whether china and the united states should rely primarily on u.s. space forces to respond to global crises and conflicts keeping only a small group of presence to reassure allies and partners. such a choice would be b
facing lbgt people. and i said, i don't know, the economy or jobs -- jobs and health care. and they were like, you know, what are the lbgt issues? you know, these are the issues. we actually cut across every demographic status and that means that in many ways, every issue that is facing other people in society are the very issues that we are facing, too. the ones that have been the big issues, maybe a little bit more unique to some of the specific issues. but they are not the only ones. if we can make ourselves visible, obviously it is not inclusive of the entire community. he beat out a whole swath of this. how many people are married? even in the broader general society versus people who aren't married. that is even a smaller number for same-sex couples. we have a lot of work to do and a lot of discrimination of people continue to face. >> i wanted to talk about thinking about the future of marriage equality. however it goes forward through the states. there is very much a way that that could be mobilized for an aggressive agenda. i wondered if he wanted to make any connections between
, the economy, it's about the national-security, and i think western countries have really, you know, women, women, women. comes right down. it's all out of the window. >> definitely experiencing. a little ahead of the curve. >> a discernible. just getting into it. your attention. the lemon. the opposition. representation in its construction and lead. if you recall, happens to be the spokeswoman of the national council. estes is now. very, very, very long name, by the way. revolutionary forces. which means it did not survive. the name has to change. >> shorten its. because we also have a woman representative. >> i wanted to underline that the vice president. [inaudible] >> the national syrian figures. we cannot resolve a very legitimate affirmation. in that sense, more prospects for us. >> all right. i would just like to move on to another question if i can. >> i was the ambassador to syria until about march. i arrived there in the summer of 2008. i watched things develop. a great fondness for the country, the traditions of coexistence and tolerance which have marked the country which is ge
economist, a very important one, which is because the world is so complicated, because the economy is so competent, because the city is so complicated that is trying to understand it is too hard for a small group of china's centrally located planners to ever fully be able to do. and so the way the markets work as they say look, no individual person has to understand the whole thing. the market works because every individual in the market understands just a little bit of it. you can focus on your part buying and selling, creating, sharing. in your part of the world, and over all the totality of all these agents will end up coming up with new solutions to problems, meeting people's needs and so when. so markets are a kind of pure network in that sense. where the pure progressives differ from traditional libertarians is that we don't think that markets solve every problem in society.elf there are many facets of human they experience that are not necessarily solved by mark is, in fact, markets create their own problems sometimes. they approach of bubbles and i things like that. in the intern
is so complicated, because the economy is so complicated because the city is so complicated, that trying to understand it is too hard for us in a centrally located planner so the way the markets work is no individual person has to understand the whole thing. every individual understands you can focus on your part buying and selling and creating and sharing and overall the to tell the theory of all of the major be the agents within the coming up with new solutions to problems meeting people's needs and so on, so the markets are a kind of peer network in that sense where the pier progressives differ from traditional libertarians as we don't think the market solvesont every problem in society and there are many facets of humanre builrience there are a lot of companies network that unitekind of that were trying to buildmparedr produced solution of the internet itself and the web and now wikipedia and many other things. there are places where you can use decentralized structure without involving traditional market relations, and that is what pier progressives are trying to do. >> host: what i
decades of the american agricultural economy, jefferson actually lost very little money on his farming operations, and so the slaves were really holding their own when commodity prices were plunging and so i mean jefferson just kept spending. the nail in the coffin financially was when he cosigned alone for his in law wilson kerry nicholas in the 1820s. nicholas was speculating in kentucky land acquisitions and he needed someone to cosign a 20,000-dollar note in the talk jefferson into it. six months later he went bankrupt and that is when the letters from monticello came. >> we have to circulate. >> all right. i want to follow up on the wheel because that is something i've been interested in on all the research i've done and of course after reading jan lewis's review yesterday where she called your book a train wreck i thought maybe you would like to use this to elaborate a little more on that and explain to the office that jefferson was made the exact terror and however, where i'm confused is that with 18 months of kosciusko's death of his will was contested by three different partie
a careful look at contemporary theory of political economy. you are going to have to bear with me for 10 minutes or so and i promise we will get back to soldiers but we can appreciate the real significance of this rhetoric of romantic patriotism in less wafers get a good grasp on the serious scientific thinking that lay behind it. informal theory, freedom to love, marry and reproduce, became essential elements of both american liberty and american power. now americans in the era of 1812 were themselves actually very well-versed in population theory. regular methodical government accounts for all the inhabitants meant that even average people had access to basic facts that they nation's population strengths. from the time of the first national census in 1792 the second which was in 1800, the nation's numbers expanded them approximately 3.9 million, to about 5.3 million they continued rising sharply, reaching 7.2 million by the third official census in 1810. so in total, the nation's numbers increased nearly twofold in just two decades. these official figures were reported widely in region
agricultural economy and, he lost very little money on his operations when the commodity prices were plunging and jefferson just kept sending debate to setting the nail in the coffin when he posted for his inlaw and 1820 he was speculating in kentucky land acquisitions she needed someone to cosign a 20,000 aware of and he talked jefferson into it and six months later he went bankrupt. and that is when the letters from monticello began to get looming. >> barry willson. >> i want to follow-up on the well because that is something i've been interested and of course after reading the review yesterday where she calls the book a train wreck i thought maybe you would want to use this to elaborate more on that. however, where i am confused is what 18 months of his staff though war was contested by three different parties and one of those in the united states at that time i don't quite understand and then jefferson predicted at this point he said this is going to really fall into a lot of litigation. it's that i think it is going to go past my lifetime he was right. so he resigned as executor and sure
difference. the u.s. is worth the sacrifice of economy but religion is not? many people to believe something like this but it seems nosy and read to make such judgments about strangers. finally, wet and frequently hears the argument that it is per se unhealthy because it is hot and uncomfortable. i remember the first time i was in barcelona and i had just been very uncomfortable with the sun. it's like a weapon and i had very fair skin and i didn't have enough covering so anyways this woman who is absolutely burned to a crisp and i was worried about the state of her skin, she made this point that the burqa is unhealthy and seem so paradoxical. [laughter] clothing that covers the body can be healthy or unhealthy, comfortable or uncomfortable depending on the fabric. people in india know and as i know when i'm in india the covering made of cotton is a very good choice in the heats because it's very comfortable, breeds easily and it keeps dust and at least some of the rays of the sun off of one's skin. it surely clear that the amount of skin displayed in typical u.s. female dress would need a d
time. the economy was wobbling, nobody wanted to upset the housing market. instead of putting fan my to sleep, the reagan administration and congress gave it a tax break and helped it survive. by the mid 1980s fannie mae was making boat loads of money again. it was profitable it was almost embarrassing. by now the ceo was a savvy fellow named david maxwell from philadelphia. he knew there was a fundamental choice to be made. the right-wing would always push to abolish fannie mae because it was a form of socialism. the left-wing would always be pressuring fannie and fred i freddie to earn the keep by doing more for the poor. and the bigger fannie and freddie got, the more political pressure they would feel. so this government charter, this role in public policy were they worth the bother? should fannie mae cut the cord with a federal government and back truly private company? maxwell order up a study of the question. and the person he hired to do the study was jim johnson. johnson came from a small town of benson, minnesota. i went there. didn't find much. [laughter] from the humble b
as a pretext to put fannie mae to sleep. but it wasn't seen as the right time. the economy was wobbly. nobody wanted to upset the housing market. so instead of putting fannie to sleep, the reagan administration, and congress, gave it a tax break and helped it survive. by the mid 1980s fannie mae was making boatloads of money i can, and it was so profitable it was almost embarrassing. by now the ceo was a very savvy fellow named david maxwell from philadelphia. maxwell knew that there was a fundamental choice to be made. the right wing would always push to abolish fannie mae. because it was a form of socialism. the left wing would always be pressuring fannie and freddie to earn their keep by doing more for the poor. and the bigger fannie and freddie got, the more political pressure they would feel. so this government the charter, this role in public policy, were they really worth the bother, or should fannie mae cut the cord to the federal government and the, a truly private company? metal ordered of the study of that question, and the person you are to do this study was jim johnson. johnson c
cripple iran's economy at the expense of destiny that pro-democracy movement there, but sanctions alone cannot resolve this issue. the military option can set back the program for a year or two but only at the expense of ensuring that eventually iran eventually gets the nuclear weapon. only diplomacy can provide a real and sustainable solution. this is no mystery to president obama, who at his november 14 press conference, declared his dedication to diplomatic solution. i quote him. there should be a way in which they, the iranians, can enjoy peaceful nuclear power while still meeting their international obligation. and providing clear issuances to the international community that they're not pursuing a nuclear weapon. and so yet i will try to make bush in the coming months to see we can open a dialogue with between iran and not just the united states, but the international community, to see if we can get this thing resolved, end quote. diplomacy is the obvious option but is not obvious how diplomacy can succeed. today with some of the foremost experts on this issue with us, to help fin
efficient. slavery was the basis of the english and the spanish and the french economy in the slave trade and a good clean ann rejected these petitions as the king george. by the time the founding fathers came along, she had almost half a million slaves to be where were they going to go? what could you do with them? they were largely unskilled and there were no opportunities in the south. one application of rolled into another plantation. there were no villages and towns and cities as there were in the north and in the north people could flee their sleeves and there were opportunities in the manufacturing where they could learn the skills and serve as apprentices. the only opportunity for the work or field hands and then when the cotton gin was invented and came in, that i absorbed all of the slaves and the unskilled labor, and you now have instead of the patrician plantation owners coming you now have these rather cool middle-income people buying property and planting the cotton. prior year to that one most of them were against slavery because the slaves competed with them for jobs but u
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